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BCD-book


A Bug Called Doug

The second book by author Chris Collin and illustrator Megan Kitchin, A Bug Called Doug was released in early 2014.

 

It’s Drew’s eighth birthday and his best mate Mikey is sleeping over.

The boys are having the best day ever!

There are new toys to play with,

Yummy birthday food to eat,

Birthday games to share,

A hideous monster under the bed…

Did someone say monster?!

 

Discovering something under the bed, causes instant panic in the two boys.

When Mum and sister Daisy get in on the act, pandemonium erupts!

 

Chris Collin and Megan Kitchin (author and illustrator of the wild and whacky Funky Chicken: A Bushy Tale of Crocs and Chooks) have teamed up again to bring you this delightfully Australian romp of a story that teaches us all a gentle lesson about preconceived ideas.

A Bug Called Doug comes with an audio-visual CD, containing a video slideshow narration of the book read by author Chris Collin with music by Adrian Hannan of The SongStore. Also included is the very catchy song ‘Doug the Bug’.

Buy A Bug Called Doug book/audio-visual CD in our secure online shopping cart!


Reviews

 

This is another beautifully presented book, carefully designed to engage, interest and educate children about Australian wildlife. It makes children aware of protecting all living things, and helps them understand how things are seldom how they first appear.

– Kids Book Review

 

In October 2012 I had the opportunity of assessing ‘A Bug Called Doug’, a picture book text by Chris Collin.

Apart from being a delightful romp of a story with boys, sister and Mum acting in perfect natural harmony, this tale has a gentle moral to it. Bugs under beds have got to be ugly, dirty and scary, yes? Well – no. The thoughtful child who encounters Doug might just have learned a lesson about preconceived ideas.

The story would read aloud beautifully and I can see it being turned into an impromptu classroom play as well. It could spark all kinds of bug research, and some fruitful discussions. I think it would appeal greatly to children of early-to-mid primary age, and adults would get a kick out of it as well.

– Sally Odgers, Independent Manuscript Assessor